News

Valentine and Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuges initiate construction projects to enhance public access

VALENTINE – This fall and winter, construction projects will begin at two Nebraska national wildlife refuges to enhance public access, visitor experience and visitor safety. At Valentine National Wildlife Refuge, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) will add gravel and recondition the existing roadway surface of the Little Hay Wildlife Drive. At Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge, the Service will renovate the Fort Falls Trail trailhead and parking area. The projects will result in temporary closures of the affected roads and trails at the refuges.

Honoring our veterans!

Honoring our veterans!

In a nation that has revered our veterans for years, COVID-19 has kept them from receiving their due recognition. And that’s sad. Our schools, from the elementary, middle, on through high school, each has a program where they honor veterans. But as the needle crept over the orange mark on the COVID-19 scale, it was clear that the programs would need to be held within the walls of the schools while the veterans watched via Striv TV.

Local residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

This photo of a deer tick on someone’s finger shows just how tiny they are and how difficult they are to detect once attached to a host.

Local residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

The corkscrew shape of Borrelia burgdorferi, which is called a spirochete, allows it to bore into any type of healthy cell where it can hide while causing widespread disruption. (Photo from CDC website)

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Fair Health’s analysis of insurance claims shows a significant difference in the reports of male and female incidence of Lyme disease.

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Clay Beck is grateful to have his life back after his multiyear struggle with Lyme disease. Since his recovery, he has married and has two children. Clay is shown here with his wife Jennifer and sons EJ and Tommy.

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Brittany (Kahler) Atteberry’s symptoms were chalked up to being a new mom when she first started having problems. She is shown here with husband Kurtis, son Chason, and new baby boy Easton.

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Sufferers of Morgellons disease were traditionally thought to be delusional and the fibers were attributed to clothing, but recently the filaments produced by the disease were found to be human tissue and consistently show infection with various kinds of Borrelia spirochetes. (Photo from Morgellonsdisease.org)

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Rose Wolf and her doctor thought that she was dealing with hormone fluctuations when her symptoms first started appearing. She is shown here with her family, l to r: Charlyttte, Triston, Trenton, Rose, JJ, and Treydon.

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

When doctors decided that Brittany was suffering from mental health, her parents took her to Dr. Calzada of the Bioadvanced Medical Clinic in Mexico, who diagnosed her Lyme disease and put her on the path to recovery.

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Brittany put Rose in contact with Sarah Kracht of the Omaha Health Therapy Center in Omaha. Kracht is able to provide many treatments in her office and at Sandhills Wellness Clinic in Atkinson, NE.

ocal residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

An erythema migrans rash is a slowly expanding rash, resembling a bullseye. Its presence is almost a guarantee of a Lyme disease diagnosis, but only about 50% of people get it. (Photo from CDC website)

Local residents struggle to get diagnosed, treated for Lyme disease

Lyme disease. Many people, including many medical professionals will tell you that it isn’t a problem in this area. In fact, it is the most predominant tick-borne disease in the United States, but most cases occur in the northeast and north central parts of the country. Some Lyme disease specialists will even insist that it doesn’t exist in South Dakota, but in 2017, the South Dakota Department of Health recorded 11 cases across the state. Those are only the reported and confirmed cases; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that only 10% of cases are actually included in official counts nationwide.

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